FAO in North America

Event Alert: FAO and National Geographic Host World Food Day Discussion Tomorrow

Submitted by Lívia Pontes on October 21, 2014

WHO: FAO and National Geographic

WHAT: World Food Day Discussion focusing on family farming. Speakers include the 2014 World Food Prize laureate Dr. Sanjaya Rajaram.

WHEN: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM

WHERE:

National Geographic Headquarters
Grosvenor Auditorium
1600 M Street NW
Washington, DC

Click here for more information. RSVP here.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essay: Family Farmers Do More Than Feed the World

Submitted by admin on October 16, 2014

By United States Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack for the Perspectives Essay Series

The headlines today can often seem bleak: worries of terrorism, global health, climate change, drought and hunger dominate the news cycle. These are extraordinarily complex and challenging issues that will impact and forever transform the lives of future generations.

Solving them is not simply about military or economic might. While they are not always fully appreciated and recognized for their capacity to address these challenges, I believe the role that agriculture and family farmers can play is significant.
At its simplest: addressing the core challenges of feeding the world and coping with climate change has implications that reach far beyond the borders of the United States. For many countries, a thriving agricultural economy is an important stepping stone out of conflict and into greater security.

We have a global responsibility to work together, share information and lift each other up as we resolve these issues challenges. Contrary to what you may hear from some in Washington, climate change is a problem and we must take action. We have already begun an earnest global discussion about what agriculture can do to lessen its impact. Last month, the United States, along with several of its country partners at the United Nations, signed on to a Global Alliance for Climate Smart Agriculture—a coordinated, focused, and global effort on climate. The Alliance will help us to better integrate and coordinate research, so that we as a world community can do a better job of understanding and appreciating what it will take to improve agricultural resiliency and productivity.
It will also take substantial increases in agricultural innovation and the productivity of family farmers—but they can’t do it alone. We must agree to band as a global, united front, to be able to adequately feed the world in the future. Today, 825 million people are already food insecure. We can and we must do more to build a better future for those people and for future generations.

Some have estimated it will take as much innovation in agriculture in the next 40 years as in the preceding 10,000 years to be able to feed a growing population. For that, we’ll need expanded agricultural research, which has implications on human health as well. Access to higher quality foods, more nutritious foods, foods that will grow in drought or flood conditions is critically important to meeting nutrition needs—in terms of having both the right foods and enough of them, in the right places—and, as a consequence, improving global health outcomes.

To address these challenges, we have U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers at work in locations across the country to develop new ideas and test innovations. Equally critical is that we aren’t keeping these revelations to ourselves—we’re making the data and information available to scientists all over the world in the hopes that they’ll be able to use the information to expand our understanding and increase our efficiency.


Creating a more food secure world, a healthier world, with greater security for all is not a panacea. While it may not solve every problem that dominates the headlines today, what it will do is create hope, security and new opportunity for many people around the world.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme. This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics. Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essay: The Wealth of the Land and the Power of the People

Submitted by admin on October 16, 2014

By Willie Nelson, Founder and President of Farm Aid for the Perspectives Essay Series

Last month at Farm Aid 2014, I was lucky to meet Phillip Barker, a Black farmer who, like many minority farmers, lost much of his farmland as a result of discriminatory lending practices by banks and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Today, Phillip and his wife Dorathy farm the 20 acres they were able to hold on to in Oxford, North Carolina. Their farm is one of two Black dairy farming operations in the state of North Carolina. They also operate a non-profit organization, Operation Spring Plant, which provides resources and training to minority and limited resource farmers, including a program that introduces young people to farming and provides youth leadership training. Phillip said one of his goals is to provide tools for the next generation and to help young people “come back to the farm to understand the wealth of the land.”

“Wealth of the land.” That’s a powerful phrase.

Phillip believes the next generation must see a sustainable livelihood from the land, but the wealth he refers to can’t be measured only in dollars. It is measured in the experience of working on the land, tending the soil, and caring for the animals and crops that grow from it. It’s measured in the ability to be independent, to feed himself and his family. It’s measured in the way he and Dorathy sustain and strengthen their community. It’s measured in being rooted to a place, and passing something valuable to the next generation.

It seems to me that understanding the real wealth in the land is key to a sustainable future for all of us.

Our greatest challenge is in re-visioning how the majority see “wealth.” The wealth of the land cannot be boiled down to the investors’ return on investment. It cannot be gauged by the commodities it returns to us—in gallons of oil and bushels of corn.

The drive to extract as much value from the land as possible—to maximize production without regard to whether we’re exhausting the soil, to give over our farmland to Wall Street investors, to seize land held by families for generations for corporate profit—bankrupts the land, our food, our nation and our future.

We need to redefine wealth as the ability to make a decent living from the land as well as to sustain it for the next generation. To grow crops for food and fuel while simultaneously enriching the soil upon which future crops depend. To support a family and a community. To work in partnership with nature to protect our health and the health of our planet. As caretakers of our soil and water, this has been and always should be the essential role of the family farmer.

Today, fewer than 2% of us live on farms. Clearly, we can’t all be family farmers, but we can all shift our priorities to ensure we’re doing our best to support them and encourage new farmers to get started on the land. Playing music to bring awareness is how I started Farm Aid in 1985, and it’s how I continue to support the people who best know how to care for the land: our family farmers. Each and every one of us has the power to do what we can to support and sustain family farmers. Our common wealth depends on it.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme. This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics. Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essay: Farmers-First for Food Security

Submitted by admin on October 16, 2014

By the Honourable Gerry Ritz, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Canada for the Perspectives Essay Series

There is no doubt that family farms are the cornerstone  to our agricultural production, making a vital contribution to economic prosperity and food security the world over. In Canada, some 98% of farms are family owned and operated. In order to put farmers first, Governments must give farmers access to the tools they need to pursue new practices, new technologies, and capture new markets.  This in turn will enable farmers to improve their incomes, support their families, and feed the world.

Canadian farmers are doing their part. As the world’s fifth largest agricultural exporter, Canada is helping to feed the world. Equally important, we are helping our trading partners strengthen their own production through leading-edge technology, from animal genetics to agronomics, to food storage and logistics.

The other key to strengthening the farm gate and food security is trade. Trade that is based on clear rules and sound science reduces price volatility, increases access to food, and helps farmers earn better incomes. To ensure that all countries have equal access to food at stable prices, we need to continue to improve market access by adopting science-based standards.

The future holds challenges and opportunities for the world’s farmers. Over the next three decades, we will need to significantly increase our agricultural productivity, while ensuring a sustainable footprint, just to meet anticipated demand. World Food Day reminds us of the need to meet this challenge and open the door to new opportunities for the world’s farmers by ensuring they have the best innovative, scientifically-proven tools in their toolbox and open access to growing global markets.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme. This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics. Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essays: Once hungry but now with food all year round

Submitted by admin on October 15, 2014

By Rodgers Mwandira, Family Farmer, Mzimba, Malawi, care of FAO-Malawi for the Perspectives Essay Series

I’m 42 years old and married to Harriet who is 41 years. I have seven children – four girls and three boys, the first born being a 23-year-old daughter and last born is a son, aged four. I’m from Mswamphira village, in Traditional Authority Mabilabo, south of Mzimba district in Malawi.

I’m a proud smallholder irrigation farmer, and belong to Mswamphira Irrigation Scheme as a member. I started serious farming in 2001 when hunger struck Malawi. By that time, I was very poor and living in grass-thatched house with nothing to show for wealth, except for my children.

Malnutrition among our children in the village and the surrounding areas was frighteningly high and rampant. As a result, we lost some children to hunger-related illness.

For such children under five, the situation was dire because most of them spent a good time at the nearby hospital’s Rehabilitation Unit. We were all affected and development, at a household level, plummeted significantly because we spent most our time with these children in hospital.

So, I asked myself whether I couldn’t do something to ensure that I have abundant nutritious foods for my children and avert malnutrition and deaths. This was the genesis and motivation for me to go into serious small-scale farming. Since then, I have no regrets at all and, as a family, we haven’t been affected by hunger since then and are living happily.

So how did I start, you may wish to know: I got a small fertilizer loan (two bags each of basal and top-dressing) from Catholic Development Commission (CADECOM), a church development arm of the Catholic Church in Malawi. I applied it to maize and lucky enough we had a good harvest that year.

I paid the loan with ease after selling the surplus maize. From the same profit, I managed to buy a cow, which has multiplied to four now. Of course, I started small by growing maize, Irish potatoes, tomatoes and vegetables like cabbage and continue to grow these crops up to now. I also raise cattle, goats, pigs and chickens. Since that time, I have been selling the surplus at Jenda Market – which is not so near from here because we spend close to K14, 000 ($35) per return trip to take our produce there for sale.

As I speak, I have enough maize to take me throughout the year, for food. I can also count four cattle, five goats, two pigs, eight chickens and an ox-cart – all these are the fruits of farming.

Honestly, we are now making profits from farming. I have even managed to build a house roofed with iron sheets and hope more good things are yet to come. Furthermore, out of my farming business, I have managed to send two children to Secondary School and I hope that the remaining five children will also face no financial hurdles to go for secondary education.

More importantly, I am food secure and eat six food groups all the time, after learning about the advantages of preparing nutritious foods for our children and us adults, thanks to FAO’s “Improving Food Security and Nutrition Policies and Programme Outreach (IFSN)” project with funding from the Flanders International Development Agency (FICA) .

My wife and I, together with our children, are very happy because we don’t buy food these days. That said, I also face a number of challenges in farming. Chief among them is the accessibility to markets. Where I go at Jenda Market to sell produce is far because I spend a lot of money and time on transport and I wish there was a market near-by.

The second challenge is that the price of fertilizers is expensive as it keeps on rising and, this alone, is deterrent enough to most of us small-holder farmers. Related to fertilizers, good quality certified seeds is a challenge and if we find them, they are exorbitantly too expensive to most of us smallholders. And I can’t not talk more enough about the challenge of pesticides and equipment like spraying machines, wheelbarrow and watering canes. In short, infrastructure is a big challenge for me to upscale agriculture production as I wished.

Talking about this year’s World Food Day theme – “Family Farming: Feeding the World, Caring for the Earth”, I think this is a very relevant and appropriate theme for me because it tallies well with what I am doing in irrigated agriculture and the modern technologies we are adopting in our small farms.

It makes a lot of sense that while we want to increase production of our maize and other cereals, as well as livestock, as farmers we should also be thinking of the fields or gardens as well as environment on which our livelihoods depends.

The only problem I have is that much as some of us find sense in conserving the environment, there is a whole lot of irresponsible subsistence farming practices, contrary to what some of us are practicing to ensure healthy environments. There is too much cutting of trees around this area, burning of bushes and burning of bricks for building houses – all of which contribute to destruction of the environment which has a negative impact on agricultural production.

So, in view of that, I think some of us who know the devastating effects of these unfriendly and unhealthy ecological practices have a huge role to enlighten our fellow farmers on proper farming practices to ensure that our children should also find the same environment in good shape. We have a role to spread the message ever more, far and deep enough.

Of course, talk of farming appear cheap and easy to most people, especially those who are not familiar with farming. On the contrary, family farming is big business and requires focus and good planning. You need good understanding and communication between a husband and a wife if you are to succeed as a farmer. You need to plan together and walk through the implementation of the plan together.

Failing to plan is also planning to fail. In my view – which is shared by wife – these are some of salient issues most people don’t know about small-scale farming.

Based on what I have said above, I don’t see the future of farming being that bright unless certain things are addressed. I think the government holds the key to the future of farming for most of us smallholders. The government needs to regulate the agriculture sector by working on reducing the price of inputs especially fertilizers which are too expensive to most of smallholders.

Accessibility in terms of good road network, distance and time-spent to markets is another area government needs to work on. There is no point walking long and expensive distances only to sell produce whose net value roughly equals the cost of transportation.

As for my children, yes, I involve them in farming most of the times. But I encourage them to go to school first because I don’t want them to take farming the way I do as an uneducated man. The future of my children is in education and not farming. There are already too many people in farming and I will not like to see education playing second fiddle to farming, as far as my children are concerned. Not in this age!

Look, much as some of us are privileged enough to get assistance from FAO projects, but if I were to ask for more supplementary help in my farming, I would ask people, donors or the government to address the challenges I have mentioned already – I think these are key. Access to markets, price of inputs and pesticides, equipment like wheelbarrows and canes etc.

And here is an advice to those who are willing to venture into farming: hard work is the mother of farming. Be willing to learn new farming technologies in view of the threat of climate change, these days. Above all, ask where you don’t understand because there are crops for every season and soil. If available, make use of government extension workers or lead farmers near you to become a successful smallholder farmer.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme. This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics. Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essays: Innovation in Family Farming

Submitted by admin on October 15, 2014

By Jomo Kwame Sundaram, Assistant Director General, Economic and Social Development Department, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations for the Perspectives Essay Series

Family farms have been contributing to food  security and nutrition for centuries, if not  millennia. But with changing demand for food as  well as increasingly scarce natural resources and  growing demographic pressures, family farms will  need to innovate rapidly to thrive.

Meanwhile, sustainable rural development  depends crucially on the viability and success of  family farming. With family farms declining in  size by ownership and often in operation as well,  improving living standards in the countryside has  become increasingly difficult over the decades.  Agricultural land use is increasingly constrained by the availability of arable land for cultivation as other land use demands increase. Addressing sustainable rural development involves economic and social considerations as well as ecological and resource constraints.

More than half a billion family farms worldwide form the backbone of agriculture in most countries. Although family farms account for more than nine out of ten farms in the world, they have considerably less farm land. They are the stewards of the world’s agricultural resources and the source of more than four fifths of the world’s food supply, but many are poor and food-insecure themselves.

Innovation challenge

Family farms are very diverse, and innovation systems must take this diversity into account. While some large farms are run as family operations, the main challenge for innovation is to reach smallholder family farms. Innovation strategies must, of course, consider family farms’ agro-ecological and socio-economic conditions.

Public efforts to promote agricultural innovation for small and medium-sized family farms should ensure that agricultural research, advisory services, market institutions and infrastructure are inclusive. Applied agricultural research for crops, livestock species and management practices should consider the challenges faced by family farms. A supportive environment for producer and other rural community-based organizations can thus help promote innovation.

The challenges facing agriculture and the institutional environment for agricultural innovation are more complex than ever. Effective innovation systems and initiatives must recognize and address this complexity. Agricultural innovation strategies should focus not only on increasing yields and net real incomes, but also on conserving natural resources, and other objectives.

An innovation system must consider all stakeholders. Therefore, it must take account of the complex contemporary policy and institutional environment for agriculture and the range of stakeholders engaged in decision-making, often with conflicting interests and priorities, thus requiring appropriate government involvement.

Public investments in agricultural R&D as well as extension and advisory services should be increased to emphasize sustainable intensification, raising yields and closing labour productivity gaps. Agricultural research and advisory services should therefore seek to raise productivity, improve sustainability, lower food prices, reduce poverty, etc.

R&D should focus on sustainable intensification, continuing to expand the production frontier in sustainable ways, working systemically and incorporating both traditional and other informal knowledge. Extension and advisory services should focus on closing yield gaps and raising the labour productivity of small and medium-sized farmers. Partnering with producer organizations can help ensure that R&D and extension services are both inclusive and responsive to farmers’ needs.

Institutional innovation

All family farmers need an enabling environment for innovation, including developmental governance, growth-oriented macroeconomic conditions, legal and regulatory regimes favourable to family farms, affordable risk management tools and improved market infrastructure. Improved access to local or wider markets for inputs and outputs, including through government procurement from family farmers, can provide strong incentives for innovation, but farmers in remote areas and other marginalized groups often face formidable barriers.

In addition, sustainable agricultural practices often have high start-up costs and long pay-off periods. Hence, farmers need appropriate incentives to provide needed environmental services. Effective local institutions, including farmer organizations, combined with social protection programmes, can help overcome these barriers.

The capacity to innovate in family farming must be supported at various levels and in different spheres. Individual innovation capacity and capabilities must be developed through education, training and extension. Incentives can create the needed networks and linkages to enable farmers, researchers and others to share information and to work towards common objectives.

Effective and inclusive producer organizations, such as cooperatives, can be crucial in supporting innovation by their members. Producer organizations can help their members better access markets and innovate and also ensure a voice for family farms in policy-making.

Innovation is not merely technical or economic, but often requires institutional, systemic and social dimensions as well. Such a holistic view of and approach to innovation can be crucial to inclusion, efficacy and success.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme. This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics. Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essays

Submitted by Amy McMillen on October 13, 2014

By Amy McMillen, Partnerships and Outreach Coordinator, FAO-Washington, DC.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme.  This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics.  Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.


Today in Perspectives, Birtukan Dagnachew Tegegn from Ethiopia shares her story of building a life and a future for her family through farming. It’s a hard life and not one she wants for her children. “Regardless, for me farming is the most fulfilling work. At the end of the day, when you collect the harvest or the fruit it makes you feel like, you are witnessing the wonders of nature, and taking care of the most valuable thing, which is the food we all eat. I truly enjoy it.”

Greg Peterson, Founder and Principal, Machinery Pete, LLC reflects on his family history of selling farm implements, back as far as four generations, “our small rural communities and farm families helped build America and make it what she is today”.  This World Food Day we are lifting up the family farmers around the world who feed us and care for the earth.  “Farm families have always been and still are the glue that powers rural America…the beautiful, dependable, trustworthy, strong, hard-working glue. Again, we say a collective ‘thank you.’”

Read both articles in today’s Perspectives.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essays

Submitted by Amy McMillen on October 10, 2014

By Sunhye Park, Communications Intern, FAO-Washington, DC

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme.  This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics.  Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.

In today’s Perspectives, Joan Brady, the President of National Farmers Union (Canada) recalls “the Hog Crisis” in 1998 that she herself suffered as a farmer. “I was struck by the image – farmers tasked with feeding the world were unable to feed themselves. Quite obviously these farm families lacked the money to purchase food because of the heavy losses they were suffering…Farmers and their families were not very linked to their own food supply.  It struck me then as it does now – as  broken and misguided.”

Looking at this problem through the lens of food sovereignty, she envisions the way forward. “Within Food Sovereignty, farm families are directly connected to their communities and the local environment within which they both live and work. … An allocation hierarchy would exist; first the farm family would eat what they had produced, the community would have access to the farm product and any excess would then go to feed other Canadians before filling gaps in the world market.”

Vicky Horn from Tangle Ridge Ranch in Alberta shares what “Family Farmers Want You to Know”. “Reality is margins on farm are tight, capital costs are huge, and financing can be hard to come by. There are many variables outside our control: extremely cold winters, drought, rising feed costs, predators, market variability – these all can dramatically affect how we do financially.” Nonetheless, she wants you to know that for family farmers, the land means life. “Our farm is deeply personal to us. It is more than just where we work and where we live. This is our life’s work; our land and animals become our life’s masterpiece. Taking care of the land, raising healthy animals and educating the next generation of stewards on our land will be our legacy.”

Read both articles in today’s Perspectives.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essays

Submitted by Amy McMillen on October 8, 2014

By Amy McMillen, Partnerships and Outreach Coordinator, FAO-Washington, DC.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme.  This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics.  Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.


Today in Perspectives, the Director General of the International Food Policy Research Institute, Shenggen Fan, dispels the romantic notion that “small is always beautiful”.  The reality is far more complicated. “The appropriate development pathway for smallholder farmers depends on the level of economic transformation, including how diversified a country’s economy is. Smallholder family farms can prosper either through a “move up” or” move out” strategy.” He details the critical measures that are required to bring down barriers to profitable and efficient smallholder agricultural systems as featured in the recent IFPRI publication Food Policy Report.  “The vicious circle of vulnerability, low-yielding activities, and food insecurity among smallholders needs to be broken. While many smallholders can find more profitable livelihood opportunities outside of agriculture, others can be transformed into profitable and efficient agricultural businesses. However, this group of potentially profitable smallholder farmers needs a policy environment that supports and nurtures this transformation and helps them overcome the challenges they face.”

Sita Poudel in Nepal founded the Women’s Group Coordination Committee to help women transform their lives through agriculture and raising livestock after she herself received goats and training from Heifer International. This neighbor-training-neighbor approach has been quite effective. Since the farmers already know each other and speak a common language, the lessons are easily understood and immediately implemented. The result? Wildly successful women-led farming businesses that ultimately benefit entire communities.

Read both articles in today’s Perspectives.

Today’s Featured Perspectives Essays

Submitted by Amy McMillen on October 7, 2014

By Amy McMillen, Partnerships and Outreach Coordinator, FAO-Washington, DC.

Curated by the FAO Liaison Office for North America with the World Food Day Network, Perspectives is an essay series that digs deeper into the annual World Food Day theme.  This year, read different points of view on the value and future of family farming from farmers, ranchers, and leaders in agriculture, research and economics.  Two essays will be featured daily starting September 15 through October 16, World Food Day.

Today in Perspectives, we are proud to bring you two submissions from FAO. The first provides a first glance into the subject for this year’s State of Food and Agriculture (SOFA) that will be launched on World Food Day, October 16.  In recognition of the International Year of Family Farming, the forthcoming 2014 edition of SOFA focuses on how to promote innovation among family farms to achieve sustainable food security and poverty alleviation. In their essay, Terri Raney, Jakob Skoet and Sarah Lowder, economists with FAO and editors of the report, emphasize that “Public investment in agricultural R&D and extension and advisory services must be increased and focused on sustainability and on raising the productivity of small and medium-sized farmers. R&D and extension services must be inclusive and responsive to farmers’ needs. Investments are needed in education and training. Capacity to innovate also depends on effective farmers’ organizations as well as networks and linkages allowing different actors in the innovation system to share information and work towards common objectives.”

As a family farmer and Yachachiq, Elbertina Loaiza Cuya, from Peru might agree with those sentiments. A Yachachiq is a local talent with extensive knowledge, chosen to disseminate her knowledge “from farmer to farmer” and to strengthen other family farmers in the adoption of simple, innovative techniques, improved housing, the adoption of healthy eating habits, and their incorporation into the local market by selling their surplus. Her essay describes her work sharing the techniques of an integrated agricultural approach, incorporating small livestock, composting, planting trees for wind protection, and especially, focusing on nutritious foods that can not only improve the health of farmers and their families, but also draw larger profits at market.  “This project is great because we can share and exchange our knowledge among the farmers. Currently I am working with 26 farmers. In Hualla alone there are more than 480 farmers implementing these techniques. But in order for this to be even better we need to continue raising awareness among the participants, my fellow farmers.” Special thanks to the FAO office in Peru who shared her story with us.

Read both articles in today’s Perspectives.



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